Hello Dear Readers!

Well these past couple of months have flown by, and I’d like to update you all on what's happening here in my corner of the world...

Where's the Candida Cure Recipes Cookbook?

I do apologize for the delay. It's in the works, but unfortunately the project got held up due to some technical difficulties I've been experiencing with the website which took precedence. I'm hopeful that the website issues will be resolved soon so I can return my focus to completing the book.

"What's this we've been hearing about Metabolic Typing?"

Yes, its true! I'm in training right now to become certified as a Metabolic Typing Practitioner. Metabolic Typing is a solid, scientific technique for determining a person's individual metabolic cycle, as observed through a 2.5 hour clinical testing procedure, as we literally watch and test 15 different parameters of the body's functions as it digests a meal. It's a very low stress test for the client, most of the time is spent sitting around, digesting :)

When people talk about Metabolic Typing, they usually refer only to a handful of books which have been written on the general subject, and the "self-testing" questionnaires included in those books. While the questionnaires can be an interesting exercise, they are not the best way to determine a person's metabolic type, since questions are subjective, and the answers can vary depending on a person's mood, beliefs, or preconceived ideas about particular subject matter.

I think a number of people judge the term "Metabolic Typing" based solely on looking at these books, which are not able to provide enough individualized recommendations to be effective. That said, they are interesting to read, and can help a person become familiarized with where, when and how the science behind the testing procedures originated.

I had the test done on myself in mid-March and found out some surprising things about myself. Many of the foods I had been eating almost on a daily basis were recommended as "avoid" foods for my particular constitution. I have been following the recommendations, adjusting them to suit my low-carb preferences, and have felt some great results!

Once I’ve completed some more training, reading of manuals and have had the time do do more independent research I will be able to answer questions in more detail about how it all works. For now, I can say I'm enthusiastic about the possibilities it provides for folks to attain a higher level of internal balance at a cellular level. Good stuff, this.

Back to the Big Apple

As some of you may remember, my husband and I moved from Manhattan to upstate NY in November, 2007. Well, sometimes life takes unexpected turns, and such is the case for us, yet again. We'll be relocating back to the fabulous Big Apple later this summer so that I can take part in the opening of a new organic cafe. I've been hired as the chef for a lovely little establishment-to-be; a community meeting place with good foods and a socially conscious objective. I'm thrilled to be involved with an inspiring collaboration of women, making this long dreamt idea become a reality.

So, life is busy busy busy around here, but it sure is good!

Meanwhile, let's talk food…

Incredible, Edible Omelets!
A perfect menu item for springtime.



I love eggs. Organic, free range eggs are a staple on my shopping list. They’re versatile, incredibly nutritious, and relatively inexpensive when you’re looking for an excellent source of protein and fat (yes, that’s right, those egg yolks are our friends!) In this edition we’re going to do three different recipes of one of my favorite ways to eat eggs – Omelets.

Spring is in full bloom. Longer days and warmer weather mean more time spent out of doors and less time spent in the kitchen. We naturally turn to quicker cooking methods as the hot summer months approach. Our menus begin to include more of the lovely foods that mark the incredible energy of spring; salad greens, fresh herbs, chives, etc.

Omelets are great for springtime. They’re easy to make, and, with endless varieties of delicious combinations they’re a perfect choice for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Omelets for dinner? Absolutely! Paired with a nice simple salad, maybe a cup of soup, you’ve got a lovely evening meal.

“But what about the cheese? I don't do so well with cheese...” Most of us think of omelets and cheese as going hand in hand. But there are so many ways to make a delicious omelet using just about anything but cheese, so put them back on the menu!

Following the recipes in this edition you’ll find tips on how to choose and care for the ideal cookware for cooking an omelet.

Omelet Recipes

Sun Dried Tomato Tapenade & Fresh Parsley Omelet

I came up with this one when I had leftover tapenade and a lot of fresh parsley in the fridge. The natural rich sweetness of the tomatoes paired with the bright zesty parsley is a surprisingly stellar combination! The fresh garlic in the tapenade is a natural candida buster, making this is a great recipe for a candida diet. If you don't do well with tomatoes, you can omit them and increase the olives, then follow the rest of the recipe from there.

Note, when you’re dealing with candida symptoms, sun dried tomatoes should be taken in small quantities, along with plenty of good protein and fat – such as in a recipe like this. They do contain carbohydrates, so I wouldn’t recommend them as a snack on an empty stomach – save them for special recipes like this.

The Tapenade

A food processor makes this a snap. For a more traditional method, (and a good arm workout) use a mortar and pestle to crush and grind all the ingredients together. It’s great with fish, pork and chicken, tossed with steamed broccoli or cauliflower, as well as in an omelet. It keeps well, in an airtight container in the fridge for a couple of weeks.

16 sun dried tomatoes – the dry kind, or packed in extra virgin olive oil
8 kalamata olives – pitted
2 or 3 medium cloves raw garlic – roughly chopped
4 large fresh basil leaves
extra virgin olive oil as needed to create a nice consistency

If you are using dry tomatoes, reconstitute them. Place them in a small pot, add just enough water to cover, set over a low flame and put the lid on. Simmer them for about 10 minutes or until they are nice and tender. Cool to room temperature. (You can cool them quickly by using a fork to get them out of the hot water, arranging them on a plate and setting in the fridge for a few minutes). Save the soaking water.

If you are using tomatoes packed in olive oil, drain them well. You can reserve the oil to add to the tapenade as needed.

Place tomatoes, olives, garlic and basil in the food processor fitted with the double blade. Press pulse to chop them. Add some of the soaking water and/or olive oil and blend, scraping down the sides frequently to make a nice consistency – not to liquidy, it should have the texture of chunky paste. The salt from the olives should be plenty, but you can add a bit of sea salt if you like. Makes about 1 ½ cups.

The Omelet

2 large eggs
2 teaspoons water
2 scallions, thinly sliced – use the white and green parts
1-2 tablespoons tapenade
¼ cup chopped parsley
crushed red chile flakes – optional
sea salt & fresh ground pepper to taste
1 tablespoon butter, clarified butter or ghee, or a mix of butter and extra virgin olive oil

Whisk the eggs and water together until well combined. Heat your large skillet over a medium flame. Add the butter or oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan evenly. Sprinkle the scallions evenly into the pan and allow them to sizzle for about one minute, just until lightly browned on the bottom.

Gently pour in the egg mixture, reduce heat to medium low and allow eggs to cook for about 2 minutes. Add a sprinkle of hot chile flakes if you like, and a light sprinkle of salt & pepper.

Add the tapenade in small dollops and let the omelet cook for another minute or so, just so the tapenade is warm. When the eggs are set (not runny) sprinkle the parsley in and turn off the heat.

Use a wide, flexible plastic spatula to gently fold one edge toward the center. Fold the other edge toward the center and gently slide, or roll the omlelet onto a large plate. Add a garnish of some sliced scallions, or a sprig of parsley and serve.

Enjoy!

_______________________________________________________________

Zucchini & Yellow Squash Omlelet with Spices & Herbs

2 large eggs
1 small zucchini – sliced thin
1 small yellow squash – sliced thin
2 scallions – sliced thin
1 serrano or jalapeno pepper – seeded and minced - optional
2 cloves fresh garlic – crushed & minced
½ teaspoon ground coriander seeds
½ teaspoon ground cumin seeds
½ teaspoon ground oregano leaves
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
crushed red chile flakes – optional
sea salt & fresh ground pepper to taste
1 tablespoon butter, clarified butter or ghee, or a mix of butter and extra virgin olive oil

Whisk the eggs together until well combined (I don’t whisk any water with the eggs for this recipe because the zucchini and yellow squash have plenty of natural moisture).

Heat your large skillet over a medium flame. Add the butter or oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan evenly. Sprinkle the scallions and peppers, if using, evenly into the pan and allow them to sizzle for about one minute, just until lightly browned on the bottom. Sprinkle in the coriander, cumin and oregano and cook for 30 seconds more, just until the spices are very fragrant.

Arrange the zucchini and yellow squash in an even layer and cook for about 2 minutes, long enough to let them get lightly browned on the bottom. Gently pour the egg mixture in an even layer over the vegetables, add a sprinkle of hot chile flakes if you like, and a light sprinkle of salt & pepper. Reduce heat to medium low and allow eggs to cook until set. Scatter the chopped cilantro over the omelet.

Use a wide, flexible plastic spatula to gently fold one edge toward the center. Fold the other edge toward the center and gently slide, or roll the omlelet onto a large plate. Add a garnish of some sliced scallions, or a sprig of cilantro and serve with a bottle of good hot sauce on the side.

_________________________________________________________________

Leftover Chicken Omelet with Onions & Fresh Herbs

You can use any leftover chicken you have around. No matter what herbs and spices you used to season the chicken, the omelet will be good, guaranteed.

2 large eggs
2 teaspoons water
½ cup leftover roasted or stewed chicken (dark meat is my favorite)
1 small yellow onion – diced small
crushed red chile flakes - optional
¼ cup chopped parsley, cilantro or basil leaves (arugula would be great too!)
1 tablespoon butter, clarified butter or ghee, or a mix of butter and extra virgin olive oil

Whisk the eggs & water together until well combined. Heat your large skillet over a medium flame. Add the butter or oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan evenly. Add the onions and cook them until they’re getting lightly browned but still crunchy. Add the chicken, then pour the egg mixture in an even layer. Add a sprinkle of hot chile flakes if you like, and a light sprinkle of salt & pepper.

Reduce heat to medium low and allow eggs to cook until set. Scatter the chopped herbs of choice over the omelet. Use a wide, flexible plastic spatula to gently fold one edge toward the center. Fold the other edge toward the center and gently slide, or roll the omlelet onto a large plate.

Add a garnish of some chopped chives, or a sprig of cilantro and serve with that bottle of good hot sauce on the side, or some pickled hot peppers would be great!

_________________________________________________________________

Are you getting some ideas?

Maybe you’ve got some roasted vegetables in the fridge, or a little bit of extra ratatouille, or some spinach that needs to be used up? Omelets are a great way to experiment with new combinations, and a fantastic addition to any cook’s repertoire.

What Kind of Omelet Pan?



Now, we’ve got the recipes, let’s talk skillets for a minute. Omelets can be frustrating if you don’t have the right kind of pan. That said, the nice thing about these recipes is that even if you simply scramble all the ingredients together and skip the omelet presentation – they’re going to be delicious either way.

You really want a good pan to make omelets a success, and non-stick skillets are so great for cooking eggs. But non-stick pans, when improperly used, can be dangerous to humans and pets, especially birds. If you have a bird as a pet, you definitely want to keep Teflon out of the house, or at least keep the bird far away from the kitchen, in a room that does not share airways to the kitchen. When heated to high temperatures, Teflon releases toxic fumes known to have caused bird deaths. There are other, newer, non-stick technologies being used by some of the high-end expensive cookware companies, you can call the customer service department of any of these companies to get more info.

If you want to avoid non-stick pans, you can choose cast iron, or enameled cast iron as good alternatives (and you only have to buy them once – they are a lifetime investment). A well seasoned cast iron pan is great for cooking eggs and omelets. You can create a practically non-stick pan when you season it properly and take good care of it (no harsh scrubbing or too much detergent). To season a new cast iron pan, warm it briefly, then coat it with high quality lard, chicken fat or coconut oil and set it in a 300F oven for about 15 minutes. Don’t use olive oil, sesame oil, grape seed, canola, safflower or other vegetable source oils to season a pan, they will make a sticky coating and tend to smoke at higher temperatures. Re-season your cast iron pans as needed.

So, how do you use a non-stick pan with minimal dangers? Here’s what I’ve learned in my research over the years:

Non-stick pans should be used only on low and medium heat settings, never on high heat – that’s when they release toxic gasses (at temps of about 600F and higher). You can preheat a non-stick pan on a medium flame (only heating up to about 300 or 350F), then reduce the flame to low while cooking an omelet.

Non-stick coatings begin to decompose after about two years, at which time these pans should be replaced. Avoid using metal utensils when cooking in a non-stick pan, you don’t want to make any scrapes or scratches in the coating. Once it’s scratched it’s dangerous.

Alright, we’ve got the recipes, we’ve got the cookware covered, now let’s make an omelet!

I hope you’ll share your best recipes too. We will feature our favorite reader recipes on the website, always attributed to the original author, of course! And if you need extra encouragement or inspiration to revamp a recipe, drop me a line, I’m here to help you figure it out.

As always, my wish to you. . . Eat well and enjoy life.

~ Susan